What I read in 2018

The fun thing about GoodReads is keeping track of what you read by date. In the spirit of making everything one big competition, I couldn’t help but notice that I have read significantly fewer books in 2018 as I did in 2017. I honestly don’t know what I did with my time; what with moving to Stittsville on a 4-week notice, driving the children back to school in Carleton Place for two months, Paul being in Latvia for part of the Summer, having physical therapy several times a week, looking for work and finding it, it’s hard to believe I wouldn’t have time to “yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of (my) mind by extensive reading.”

January

In January, I finished reading “Papillon” by Henri Charrière. “Papillon” is the questionable autobiography of Henri Charrière, a French man unjustly sentenced to forced labour in the French prison colony of Guyana in 1931. When I was in secondaire 4 (the Quebec equivalent of grade 10), our geography teacher stopped teaching geography in May of every year and read this book to his students from memory. I’m pretty sure he left out the parts where Papillon’s dingy is shipwrecked on a South American beach and he is welcomed by a tribe of naked aboriginal warriors and given two nymphomaniac teenage sisters to marry… Still, it was riveting.

After finishing “Papillon” I tackled “All the Light We Cannot See” by Anthony Doerr. This book left its mark as one of the best-written, gut-wrenching books I have ever read. From its unique story to its creative structure (I must have read the book three times for all the times I re-read chapters from the vantage point of the characters as they were revealed) it is a true work of genius.

February/March

In February and March I read Ashlee Vance’s biography of Elon Musk. Well-done and worth a read. Everyone speaks of Elon Musk’s work ethics but I don’t think “ethics” means what people think it does. In that context, “ethics” are the moral principles governing a person’s behaviour and activities. Reading “Elon Musk: Tesla, Space X, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future” I didn’t get the sense that Elon Musk had succeeded because he made decisions based on moral considerations — even if I didn’t share his principles. Elon Musk succeeded in spite of himself by brute force: he has worked relentlessly at launching his companies at the exclusion of everything else. Maybe that’s a moral imperative but the picture of Elon Musk painted by Ashlee Vance betrays a man who is compulsively pursuing the goals he set out for himself, not someone who is making moral choices in the conduct of his activities.

April

In April, we set the wheels in motions for our move to Stittsville and it looks like I didn’t read much. Imagine that!

May/June

In May, I started reading “Two” by Gulzar. Gulzar is a prolific poet and lyric-writer for some of Bollywood’s most beloved soundtracks. “Two” was his first novel and it chronicles the migration of two groups of villagers over the confusing few months preceding the partition of India and Pakistan. Before the lines were drawn, before anyone knew where to go or what was going on. Moved by a sense of impeding doom, Muslims and Hindus who had always lived harmoniously side-by-side set out in separate groups to move where they thought they would be welcomed, away from the sectarian violence rising on each side of the newly created border.

July/August

In July and August, I read “L’étranger” by Albert Camus. What can I write about this book that hasn’t been written before? It’s a French classic about a man whose naiveté and honesty — and stupidity? — cause his downfall. He is in equal parts victim of his own choices and wrapped up in events beyond his control, which makes him nearly impossible to sympathize with or completely hate. That’s the genius of Camus’ writing: his ability to show us our own absurdity and hubris through Meurseault’s nihilism. The book opens with one of the most famous French opening lines: « Aujourd’hui, maman est morte. Ou peut-être hier, je ne sais pas. » (Today, mother died. Or was it yesterday, I don’t know.) Slowly, Camus brings us to the same detachment and disenfranchisement as his narrator so that by the time he is condemned to death following a botched and superficial trial, we too can take it or leave it. The genius of “L’étranger” is in what it does to the reader when we become Meurseault.

August to October

In August to October, I slugged through “The God of Small Things” and wrote a review about it. You can read it here. Please read it. I almost broke my brain writing it.

November

In November I started “East of Eden” by John Steinbeck. Then I found a job. Then my e-reader ran out of juice and I couldn’t find my charger (try that excuse with a paperback!). I’m only on chapter 4 but every sentence is distilled perfection. I already have several index cards with “perfectly written phrases” kicking around. I know this book will bowl me over. I’ll write about it in 2019.

December

In December I started working at City Hall for my municipal councillor, which blew my urbanism geek’s closet door wide open. “Happy City: Transforming our lives through urban design” by Charles Montgomery is putting some of my experience with the isolation, depression and rebirth I felt when we moved to the country and back into the city. I write quotes on index cards when I read and stick them into the book for future reference. I’m only 50 pages into ‘Happy City” and I have already written so many memorable and important quotes on index cards that I had to start using Evernote because the book was getting too unwieldy from all the extra weight. I’ll probably write a full review when I’m done.

There you have it! Books from 2018. What did you read?